Labour Party manifesto 2019: 12 key policies explained (2023)

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Labour Party manifesto 2019: 12 key policies explained (1)

The Labour Party has launched its 2019 election manifesto, with the slogan It's Time For Real Change. It sets out the policies the party aims to introduce should it win the election.

The full document runs to 105 pages. But what are the promises that will grab the public's attention, and potentially win over voters on polling day, 12 December?

1. Increase health budget by 4.3%

The party also wants to cut private provision in the NHS.

The 4.3% per year rise is at the top end of what health think tanks and analysts have been calling for. Labour would also have to find money to cover revenue lost from its pledges to scrap prescription, basic dentistry and hospital car parking charges.

A key section covers Labour's plan to cut private provision in the NHS, which currently accounts for about 7% of the health budget in England. This would clearly involve outsourced contracts, for example for physiotherapy and community health.

But will NHS hospitals suddenly see their waiting lists balloon as a result of operations outsourced to private hospitals being brought back into the public sector? And are these pledges longer-term aspirations or shorter-term priorities?

Healthcare is devolved so these policies would apply to England only, but the devolved nations would benefit from the funding.

2. Hold a second referendum on Brexit

Labour will renegotiate a new Brexit deal within three months, and hold a referendum on the deal or Remain within six months

The short section called "The Final Say on Brexit" only begins on page 89 of this manifesto. The other main UK-wide parties have simple slogans, but Labour's policy is more complicated and doesn't fit on a manifesto cover or the side of a bus.

It promises to renegotiate a new Brexit deal within three months, based on a new UK-EU customs union and close EU single market alignment. It would also give EU nationals living and working in the UK the automatic right to stay. That deal would then be put to a legally-binding referendum within six months, alongside the option to remain in the EU.

Labour wants to appeal to both Leavers and Remainers and to give the people the final say. It would implement the referendum result immediately. But Mr Corbyn will not say how he would vote in it. And that continues to divert attention away from his other practical policies.

This policy would apply to the whole of the UK.

Update: On 22 November Jeremy Corbyn revealed that he would remain neutral if there was another referendum.

  • What is Labour's Brexit plan?
  • Will this be a Brexit election?

3. Raise minimum wage from £8.21 to £10

It would boost anyone over the age of 25 earning the minimum wage, known as the National Living Wage.

(Video) Labour's Manifesto Quickly Summarised (2019 Election) - TLDR News

The Conservatives had already announced the living wage would gradually increase to £10.50 over the next six years. Labour is now promising more and faster, with all workers over 16 years old getting £10 an hour within the next year. It is an attempt to tackle the growing issue of in-work poverty.

It's cheaper than other policy announcements because employers, rather than government, mostly pay the wages, but it's a big jump for them to swallow in a very short timeframe. Labour is also promising extra measures to boost workers' rights, including longer maternity and paternity pay, and guaranteed bereavement pay.

This would apply to the whole of the UK.

  • How high could the lowest wages go?
  • Is the minimum wage enough to live on?

4. Stop state pension age rises

Not long ago, government number-crunchers suggested workers under 30 may not receive a state pension until they turned 70. So Labour's plan to freeze the state pension age at 66 for the foreseeable future has been called a "gargantuan promise" by one analyst.

It would cost billions of pounds more than most recent government plans to raise the age for men and women to 68 by 2039. Yet, it would clearly be popular among middle-age voters.

For existing pensioners, the so-called triple-lock - linking annual state pension rises to the highest of average earnings, the cost of living, or 2.5% - would continue, as all the major parties have promised. There are also pitches to specific groups. The so-called Waspi women - born in the 1950s and furious with "surprise" pension age changes - are promised compensation.

This would apply to the whole of the UK.

  • The fight over women's pensions
  • Why 70 may be the new 65

5. Introduce a National Care Service

Provide "community-based, person-centred" support in England, including free personal care.

Labour's plan for a comprehensive National Care Service is bold. The question will be whether their costings stand-up to scrutiny. That is not just about the affordability of the plan now, but also its cost as the population ages. At the heart of the policy is free personal care for older people who need help with day-to-day tasks like washing, dressing and medication.

This system already operates in Scotland, but in England, the idea was rejected 20 years ago by the then-Labour government as too expensive. There are also promises to double the number of people receiving help, so easing NHS pressures. Plans to reform the care system have ended up as political footballs in past elections - the challenge for Labour will be building a consensus around their ideas.

Health and social care is devolved. This would apply to England only.

  • Will Jeremy Corbyn's long march lead to power?

6. Bring forward net-zero target

To put the UK on track for a net-zero carbon energy system within the 2030s.

The date for reducing carbon emissions to effectively zero is much sooner than the government envisages. It's not quite the neat formulation of "net zero" by 2030 that many party activists wanted (and the Green Party has promised). Instead, in one line, the document talks of achieving "the substantial majority of our emissions reductions" by 2030.

(Video) Jeremy Corbyn launches Labour Party manifesto

In another, it mentions putting the UK "on track for a net-zero carbon energy system within the 2030s". Presumably that creates enough stretch room to get to 2040 - five years earlier than the Lib Dems' target year and 10 years earlier than the Tories.

This policy would apply to the whole of the UK

7. Nationalise key industries

The party will nationalise the so-called big six energy firms, National Grid, the water industry, Royal Mail, railways and the broadband arm of BT.

Labour's manifesto is one of the most radical proposed overhauls of the way companies are owned and run in decades. It would mark the biggest ownership takeover by the state since the nationalisations that occurred after the outbreak of World War Two.

Those companies that Labour does not want to own and operate themselves will also face a huge change in the way they are supervised by government. The current inhabitants of company boardrooms are very aware life would be very different under a Labour government.

This policy would apply to the whole of the UK.

  • How much could Labour's nationalisation plan cost?

8. Scrap Universal Credit

Start work on a new benefits system to replace controversial benefit.

Labour's plan to scrap Universal Credit deals with its immediate concerns about the much-criticised benefit. However, the party does not say what it would replace it with. Universal Credit was originally introduced to tackle the complexity and unfairness of the existing benefits system. But many of the accompanying changes became linked to austerity measures like benefit caps.

Going back to the system which Universal Credit replaced would create its own problems. And its introduction shows just how difficult it can be to devise a new system that works. Labour has said it will start work on ideas for a new system immediately, but getting that right is likely to take years.

This would apply across the UK.

9. Abolish private schools' charitable status

There are also plans to scrap tuition fees and bring back maintenance grants for the poorest students.

The controversial policy of abolishing private schools, voted through at conference, is being parked for the moment. But there is a firm commitment to remove their charitable tax status.

The big pledge, as in 2017, is the abolition of tuition fees. Universities will worry that the commitment to find public money to replace them could come under pressure if public finances tighten. Scrapping tuition fees will benefit the wealthiest students most. Maintenance grants would be restored for the poorest. The combined cost is estimated at £12bn a year.

On school funding, Labour's promise goes further than the Conservatives and Lib Dems. By 2022-2023, spending would be £10.5bn higher in cash terms, which would reverse cuts (and then some) made since 2010.

Education is devolved. This would apply to England only.

(Video) Labour manifesto vows BILLIONS in increased spending

Image source, Getty Images

10. Free bus travel for under-25s

Labour will also bring the railways back into public ownership.

Labour says it will bring the railways back into public ownership when the current rail franchises expire. The party says that means there will be no cost to the government as the contracts will have ended. However, it is unclear who will then own the trains and the associated costs.

The use of driver-only operated trains will also be stopped, having caused years of disruption because of industrial action by disgruntled staff. Industry estimates this would cost more than £200m a year. And the bus system will fall under council control again while thousands of routes that have been cut will be reinstated. Free bus travel is also promised for under-25s. The costs for this are not provided in the manifesto.

Labour promises a £250bn green transformation fund; HS2 will be built and extended into Scotland and long-suffering train passengers in the north of England will get "Crossrail for the North".

Transport is partly devolved. Free bus travel for under-25s would apply to England only, while infrastructure projects and renationalisation would apply across the UK.

11. Give EU nationals the right to remain

It will mean EU citizens in the UK no longer have to apply to continue living and working in the country.

The settlement scheme was set up by the Conservative government to formalise the rights of EU citizens to continue living and working in the UK after Brexit. Ministers have claimed the system is working well with applications from around 2.45 million people so far.

But that means almost one million EU nationals have yet to sign up, raising concerns that some who have difficulty proving they've been in Britain could be at risk of deportation. Labour's proposal would end the worry and uncertainty for EU citizens in Britain, but it could create problems for border staff after Brexit in distinguishing between those who've already been living in the UK and new arrivals who may have certain restrictions.

This policy would apply to the whole of the UK.

12. Build 100,000 council homes a year

Start a rapid programme of homebuilding.

Labour's promise to build 100,000 council homes and 50,000 housing association properties a year by the end of the five-year Parliament marks a rapid change. Building on this scale has not been seen for 40 years. The UK's population is getting older and one in five people has a disability, so the type of homes proposed will face close scrutiny. There are also questions over the availability of construction workers to build them.

More people have rented from private landlords than social ones since 2013. Many are aged under 35. For them, rent controls would aim to keep down costs by linking rent rises to inflation (the cost of living) and giving city authorities the power to be even stricter. This will reignite debate over their effectiveness. The plan for a new Department for Housing shows how central this area is to Labour's key policies.

Housing is devolved so this policy would apply to England only.

What do the other parties offer?

  • Brexit Party: Key policies explained
  • Conservative Party manifesto: Key points explained
  • Green Party manifesto: Key points explained
  • Liberal Democrats manifesto: Key points explained
  • Plaid Cymru manifesto: Key points explained
  • SNP manifesto: Key points explained

(Video) General Election 2019: The main parties' manifestos on NHS, climate change, crime & tax

What are the parties promising you?

Here's a concise guide to where the parties stand on key issues like Brexit, education and the NHS.

  • General election policy guide

Correction 24th February 2020: This article has been amended to clarify that there is some cost to the government, in terms of wages, from introducing the living wage.

More on this story

  • Labour vows to 'transform' UK at manifesto launch

    • 22 November 2019

  • The manifesto Corbyn has always wanted

    • 21 November 2019

  • A simple guide to the Labour Party

    • 14 November 2019

  • Jeremy Corbyn: Labour's accidental leader

    • 21 November 2019

    (Video) Britain's Labour Party unveils election manifesto

FAQs

What are the core beliefs of the Labour party? ›

It proclaimed a socialist party whose principles included a guaranteed minimum standard of living for everyone, nationalisation of industry, and heavy taxation of large incomes and of wealth.

What is a policy manifesto? ›

A manifesto is a published declaration of the intentions, motives, or views of the issuer, be it an individual, group, political party or government.

What is the Labour Party simple? ›

The Labour Party is the main centre-left political party in the United Kingdom. It is a social democratic party. It has been one of the UK's two main political parties from the early 20th century to the present day.

What do the Scottish Labour Party believe in? ›

Scottish Labour
Scottish Labour Party Pàrtaidh Làbarach na h-Alba (Scottish Gaelic) Scots Labour Pairty (Scots)
Youth wingScottish Young Labour
Membership (2021)16,467
IdeologySocial democracy British unionism
Political positionCentre-left
17 more rows

What is left-wing and right wing? ›

Ideological groupings. Generally, the left-wing is characterized by an emphasis on "ideas such as freedom, equality, fraternity, rights, progress, reform and internationalism" while the right-wing is characterized by an emphasis on "notions such as authority, hierarchy, order, duty, tradition, reaction and nationalism" ...

What are conservative beliefs? ›

They advocate low taxes, free markets, deregulation, privatization, and reduced government spending and government debt. Social conservatives see traditional social values, often rooted in familialism and religion, as being threatened by secularism and moral relativism.

What is the main point or idea of the manifesto? ›

manifesto, a document publicly declaring the position or program of its issuer. A manifesto advances a set of ideas, opinions, or views, but it can also lay out a plan of action. While it can address any topic, it most often concerns art, literature, or politics.

How is a manifesto written? ›

Your candidate support statement, sometimes referred to as a manifesto, should simply state what you plan to do in your role and what changes you would make. It isn't an excuse to bad mouth your opposition, or make unrealistic promises. Think about what you can achieve and what other students would respond to well.

How do you write a short manifesto? ›

Our Manifesto Top Tips

Think of your manifesto as your elevator pitch to students, a way to quickly illustrate what you stand for. Use the rule of three (or 5). Try not to go overboard on a long list of goals, chose things that are punchy, understandable and achievable. Make sure your points are tangible.

What's the difference between Labor and Labour? ›

There is no difference in meaning between labor and labour. Labor is the preferred spelling in American English, and labour is preferred throughout the rest of the English-speaking world. One exception: In Australia, the American spelling is used in reference to the Australian Labor Party.

What does CLP stand for Labour? ›

A constituency Labour Party (CLP) is an organisation of members of the British Labour Party who live in a particular parliamentary constituency. In England and Wales, CLP boundaries coincide with those for UK parliamentary constituencies.

Is the Labour party left or right? ›

Labour's status as a socialist party has been disputed by those who do not see the party as being part of the left, although the general consensus is that Labour are a left-wing political party.

How many seats did Labour lose in Scotland? ›

2019 United Kingdom general election in Scotland
LeaderJo Swinson (lost seat)Jeremy Corbyn
PartyLiberal DemocratsLabour
Leader since22 July 201912 September 2015
Last election4 seats, 6.8%7 seats, 27.1%
Seats won41
18 more rows

Does Scotland have a Socialist party? ›

The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP; Scottish Gaelic: Pàrtaidh Sòisealach na h-Alba; Scots: Scots Socialist Pairtie) is a left-wing political party campaigning for the establishment of an independent socialist Scotland. The party was founded in 1998.

Who founded Scottish Labour? ›

The Scottish Labour Party (SLP), also known as the Scottish Parliamentary Labour Party, was formed by Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham, the first socialist MP in the Parliament of the United Kingdom, who later went on to become the first president of the Scottish National Party, and Keir Hardie, who later became the ...

What are 5 political rights? ›

Political rights include natural justice (procedural fairness) in law, such as the rights of the accused, including the right to a fair trial; due process; the right to seek redress or a legal remedy; and rights of participation in civil society and politics such as freedom of association, the right to assemble, the ...

What does liberal stand for? ›

Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but they generally support private property, market economies, individual rights (including civil rights and human rights), liberal democracy, secularism, rule of law, economic and political freedom, freedom of speech, freedom ...

Is libertarian left or right? ›

Definition. Although libertarianism originated as a form of left-wing politics, the development in the mid-20th century of modern libertarianism in the United States resulted in libertarianism being commonly associated with right-wing politics.

What are the 5 main characteristics of conservatism? ›

7 Core Principles of Conservatism
  • Individual Freedom. The birth of our great nation was inspired by the bold declaration that our individual,God-given liberties should be preserved against government intrusion. ...
  • Limited Government. ...
  • The Rule of Law. ...
  • Peace through Strength. ...
  • Fiscal Responsibility. ...
  • Free Markets. ...
  • Human Dignity.

What does liberal mean in politics? ›

'Liberal' shares a root with 'liberty' and can mean anything from "generous" to "loose" to "broad-minded." Politically, it means "“a person who believes that government should be active in supporting social and political change."

What are conservative values UK? ›

British Conservatives believe in the following things: Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland should remain as part of the United Kingdom. Marriage should be encouraged through the tax system. Free markets and education should create an opportunity society.

How do you write an introduction to a manifesto? ›

To write a manifesto, start by introducing yourself and your goals. Try to include personal beliefs or experiences that can give your readers a strong sense of who you are. Then, share your thesis, or overall message.

Which question should be considered when writing a manifesto? ›

A manifesto is a declaration of aims and policy. It asks the question, "What do you believe?" Read the attached Manifesto formulated by The Bogside Artists, a group of muralists from Derry/Londonderry in Northern Ireland.

What should a leadership manifesto include? ›

A Leadership Manifesto: A Guide to Greatness
  • I will commit to being an authentic person. ...
  • I will take responsibility for my life. ...
  • I will communicate in a way that conveys what I mean to say. ...
  • I will remember to serve something bigger than myself. ...
  • I will take ownership of my work and strive. ...
  • I will embrace resilience.

What is a company manifesto? ›

A brand manifesto describes why your organization exists, its purpose, and why people should care about your brand. It's typically an emotional story that captivates your audience, emotionally connects with them, and persuades them to support your brand.

How do you pronounce manifestoes? ›

How To Say Manifestoes - YouTube

What is a design manifesto? ›

Manifesto: an Italian word derived from the Latin 'manifestum', meaning clear or conspicuous. In architecture, a manifesto declares a designer's principles, intentions, motives or views.

How do you write a business manifesto? ›

How to write a brand manifesto
  1. Make it read like a story.
  2. Tie your brand to the bigger mission.
  3. Set your goal.
  4. Add a call-to-action.
  5. Speak in first and second person.
  6. Stay consistent with brand tone.
  7. Be authentic.
  8. Look good.
7 Jan 2022

Who is a dining hall prefect? ›

The dining hall prefects are responsible for general hygiene and cleanliness at the dining hall. The prefects help the running of the school canteen and make sure that every student in the dining hall has something to fill his/her belly.

Is color spelled color or Colour? ›

When choosing between color and colour, keep in mind that both spellings are correct. The shorter one, color, is the preferred spelling in the United States. The rest of the English-speaking world uses the longer form, colour.

Where does the word labor come from? ›

The English noun labor comes into English via Old French labor, labour (French labeur ) from Latin labōr-, the inflectional stem of the noun labor “labor, work, toil.” The Latin noun has just about all the meanings of English labor (including that of childbirth), but not the relatively modern English sense “workers, ...

When did labour become labor? ›

The party adopted the formal name "Australian Labour Party" in 1908, but changed the spelling of "Labour" in its name to "Labor" in 1912.

What does CLP stand for UK? ›

European Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures came into force on 20 January 2009 in all European Union (EU) Member States, including the UK. It is known by its abbreviated form, 'the CLP Regulation' or just plain 'CLP'.

What does the chair of the Labour party do? ›

The Chair of the Labour Party is a position in either the Cabinet or the Shadow Cabinet of the United Kingdom. The Chair is responsible for administration of the party and overseeing general election campaigns, and is typically held concurrently with another position.

What does the party Chair do? ›

Chairmen often play important roles in strategies to recruit and retain members, in campaign fundraising, and in internal party governance, where they may serve as a member of, or even preside over, a governing board or council.

What does right wing mean? ›

The term right-wing can generally refer to the section of a political party or system that advocates free enterprise and private ownership, and typically favours socially traditional ideas.

What does Tories stand for? ›

A Tory (/ˈtɔːri/) is a person who holds a political philosophy known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved in the English culture throughout history.

What does it mean to be left wing UK? ›

Left-wing politics typically involve a concern for those in society whom its adherents perceive as disadvantaged relative to others as well as a belief that there are unjustified inequalities that need to be reduced or abolished.

What percentage of Scots voted Tory? ›

The Conservatives won their highest vote share in any election in Scotland since 1979, at 29%, and their highest number of MPs since 1983, winning thirteen.

How many MPs do Labour have in Scotland? ›

Composition
AffiliationMembers (current)Voteshare (GE 2019)
Alba Party2N/A
Scottish Labour118.6%
Other21.8%
Total59
3 more rows

What was Tory majority 2019? ›

The Conservatives won 365 seats, their highest number and proportion of seats since 1987, and recorded their highest share of the popular vote since 1979; many of their gains were made in long-held Labour seats, dubbed the 'red wall', which had registered a strong 'Leave' vote in the 2016 EU referendum.

What country is socialist? ›

Marxist–Leninist states
CountrySinceParty
People's Republic of China1 October 1949Chinese Communist Party
Republic of Cuba16 April 1961Communist Party of Cuba
Lao People's Democratic Republic2 December 1975Lao People's Revolutionary Party
Socialist Republic of Vietnam2 September 1945Communist Party of Vietnam

Is there a British Socialist Party? ›

The Socialist Party of Great Britain (SPGB) is a socialist political party in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1904 as a split from the Social Democratic Federation (SDF), it advocates using the ballot box for revolutionary purposes and opposes both Leninism and reformism.

Does the UK have a communist party? ›

The Communist Party of Britain was established/re-established, in April 1988 by a disaffected section of the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB).

What do the Scottish Labour party believe in? ›

Scottish Labour
Scottish Labour Party Pàrtaidh Làbarach na h-Alba (Scottish Gaelic) Scots Labour Pairty (Scots)
Youth wingScottish Young Labour
Membership (2021)16,467
IdeologySocial democracy British unionism
Political positionCentre-left
17 more rows

How many Labour members are there? ›

Current membership
PartyTotal current membershipFull members (if applicable)
Labour430,000N/A
Conservatives200,000N/A
SNP119,000N/A
Liberal Democrats98,24798,247
6 more rows

Where was the Labour party started? ›

What are the core conservative values? ›

7 Core Principles of Conservatism
  • Individual Freedom. The birth of our great nation was inspired by the bold declaration that our individual,God-given liberties should be preserved against government intrusion. ...
  • Limited Government. ...
  • The Rule of Law. ...
  • Peace through Strength. ...
  • Fiscal Responsibility. ...
  • Free Markets. ...
  • Human Dignity.

Is the Labour party left or right? ›

Labour's status as a socialist party has been disputed by those who do not see the party as being part of the left, although the general consensus is that Labour are a left-wing political party.

What are the beliefs of liberal party? ›

Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but they generally support private property, market economies, individual rights (including civil rights and human rights), liberal democracy, secularism, rule of law, economic and political freedom, freedom of speech, freedom ...

What does the Conservative Party believe in UK? ›

The party has generally had liberal economic policies. that favours free market economics. The party is British unionist, opposing Irish reunification, Scottish and Welsh independence, and is generally critical of devolution.

What does liberal mean in politics? ›

'Liberal' shares a root with 'liberty' and can mean anything from "generous" to "loose" to "broad-minded." Politically, it means "“a person who believes that government should be active in supporting social and political change."

What is a synonym for conservatism? ›

temperance. nounself-restraint; abstinence. abnegation. abstemiousness. asceticism.

What are moderate views in politics? ›

Moderate is an ideological category which designates a rejection of radical or extreme views, especially in regard to politics and religion. A moderate is considered someone occupying any mainstream position avoiding extreme views.

What does right wing mean? ›

The term right-wing can generally refer to the section of a political party or system that advocates free enterprise and private ownership, and typically favours socially traditional ideas.

What does Tories stand for? ›

A Tory (/ˈtɔːri/) is a person who holds a political philosophy known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved in the English culture throughout history.

What does it mean to be left wing UK? ›

Left-wing politics typically involve a concern for those in society whom its adherents perceive as disadvantaged relative to others as well as a belief that there are unjustified inequalities that need to be reduced or abolished.

Who is liberal person? ›

a : one who is open-minded or not strict in the observance of orthodox, traditional, or established forms or ways. b capitalized : a member or supporter of a liberal political party (see liberal entry 1 sense 6) c : an advocate or adherent of liberalism especially in individual rights.

What is the key ideas of conservatism? ›

Traditionalist conservatism is a political philosophy emphasizing the need for the principles of natural law and transcendent moral order, tradition, hierarchy and organic unity, agrarianism, classicism and high culture as well as the intersecting spheres of loyalty.

Who created neoliberalism? ›

Neoliberalism began accelerating in importance with the establishment of the Mont Pelerin Society in 1947, whose founding members included Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman, Karl Popper, George Stigler and Ludwig von Mises.

Why are they called Tories? ›

As a political term, Tory was an insult (derived from the Middle Irish word tóraidhe, modern Irish tóraí, meaning "outlaw", "robber", from the Irish word tóir, meaning "pursuit" since outlaws were "pursued men") that entered English politics during the Exclusion Bill crisis of 1678–1681.

What are the 4 types of political parties? ›

Types of party organizations. Political scientists have distinguished between different types of political parties that have evolved throughout history. These include cadre parties, mass parties, catch-all parties and cartel parties.

Are Tories and conservatives the same? ›

The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party, also known simply as the Conservatives and colloquially as the Tories, is one of two main political parties in the United Kingdom, alongside its primary rival since the 1930s, the Labour Party.

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